Beam Me Up
July 31st to August 10th

Click image for enlargement.
Sheila was given a second warp beam for her large AVL loom. Only problem was that the new beam was a foot wider than the loom!

It's sectional beam, but here it is with the rakes removed. The green tape shows where it has to be cut off.

(31:07:2019)

The rakes will have to be shortened too.

(31:07:2019)
Getting set up for cutting. The wood and the inner pipe will have to be cut separately.

(31:07:2019)

An antique back saw (that used to belong to Sheila's father). The square keeps the cut straight.

(01:08:2019)
Back at the loom, checking that the length is correct.

(01:08:2019)

And marking the cut off point for the pipe.

(01:08:2019)
The pieces that have been removed from the beam, rakes and the rod that cords are attached to.

(01:08:2019)

The rakes and rod are back in place, and new ends made for the beam so that it matches the existing beam.

(03:08:2019)
Now to cut the pipe with the angle grinder!

(03:08:2019)

Shortened and filed smooth.

(03:08:2019)
The other end with the roller for the brake cord.

(03:08:2019)

On the loom above the original beam.

(03:08:2019)
The brake has been installed. You may notice that this is at the opposite end from the pictures above. Sheila got her lefts and rights reversed when reading the instruction manual, and the brake was put on the "wrong" side.

(08:08:2019)

Here's the loom with the upper and lower brakes at opposite ends.

Notice the silver roller - something else that had to be shortened, now in place. The warp will go from the upper beam, under the silver roller and to the front of the loom for threading.

(08:08:2019)
The loom also had a removable bar that was used to hold a tensions box, or clamp a raddle when beaming the warp on the lower beam.

the brackets holding the bar had to be modified to allow for the new roller.

(09:08:2019)

The bar in place below the new beam. There may be more modifications needed as it is very close.

Notice that the brake is no longer at the near end.

(09:08:2019)
The brake would probably have worked at the other side, but Sheila realized that it would have prevented her from getting inside the back of the loom, which is necessary when beaming a warp.

The brake consists of a heavy weight on an arm attached to a cord that goes around the roller at the end of the beam. It allows the warp to advance continuously, while still maintaining tension.

(09:08:2019)

Both brakes as seen from the outside of the loom.

Now Sheila gets to reattach a whole lot of cords to the upper beam.

(09:08:2019)
The rakes were not exactly rusted, but were oxidized enough to be rough. Allan clamped three foam sanding pads together and Sheila did the rubbing - up-down, back and forth - about ten times between each pair of hoops (times 48 times 4). It actually only took about fifteen minutes for each rake and they were done over two days.

(09:08:2019)

All ready and waiting for a test warp. For those wondering why there is not a cord for each space, Sheila does not wind the warps "sectionally" one section at a time. Instead she winds the whole warp on a warping mill and puts a rod through the end loops and enough cords to hold it in place without bending.

(09:08:2019)
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