Open Exhibits

There were 45 categories available for awards, all donated by ANWG member guilds.
June 14th and 15th

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Handspun, handwoven jacket by Mary Gillespie. Award for Fabric Woven on Fewer than 4 Shafts.

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Set of placemats by Norma Dean, Barb Newhouse, Heather Kerr and me - from our guild's exchange. We won the award for Weaving - Conference Theme.

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There were lots of amazing silk scarves.

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3-D items. Those at the top were made by Margaret Tayti and won the prize for 3-D Project.

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"Rainbow Gathering" by Kathleen O'Hern - a wall hanging with a copper wire grid and handwoven panels. This was one of my favourites even though it didn't win an award.

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Rainbow Shawl: Shadows and Light by Karla Mather-Cocks uses clasped weft and undulating twill.

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Janice Griffiths' ANWG jacket used some yarn dyed at the Calgary ANWG, and the jacket was partly sewn in a workshop at the Victoria ANWG.

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Bonnie Lefebre's "Confluence of Fibre" used handspun, natural dyed yarn for hand knitting from her own design. She won the award for Spinning - Conference Theme.

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There were several handwoven garments. The coat in the centre - by Marlene Randall - called "What Rubbish!" was made of recycled jeans and indigo dyed warp. It won awards for Recycled Yarn(s)/Fabrics and Other Techniques - Best in Show.

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There were also lots of lovely throws. The one on the left, also by Janice Griffiths, won awards for Spinning - for the Home, and Spinning - Best in show.

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Handwoven fabric can be made into bags too. The gold one, by Toby Smith, won an award for Kumihimo for it's handles.

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This lovely natural dyed shawl by Grace Morrice won the award for Spinning - Knit/Crocheted Garment.

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More shawls and throws. On the left - a shawl by Jennifer Verrall won for Fabric woven on more than 4, in the centre - shawl by Terry Mattison won Weaving - Best Use of Design, and at the right - Sunflower Throw by Linda Daniels.

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A closer look at the table runner in the centre right above, called "Bubbles" by Susan Millikan in four colour double weave.

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I don't see any prize ribbons, but I like these scarves.

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More winners - at the far left a lovely handspun sweater by Doreen Mac Lauchlan won for Spinning - Conference Colours. In the centre - Sheila Bush's shawl won the "Work I wish I had Woven" award, and at the right - Judith Warren's shawl won for Fabric Woven on More Than 4.

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This lush looking skein of Yak and Bombyx silk by Louise Smith won for Skein - Exotic Fibres and Skein - Wheel Spun.

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More skeins - the large green one - by Birthe Miller was made of merino, qiviut, angora and alpaca. It also won for Skein Wheel spun. The smaller green skein at the right by Terry Mattison was spun using an ultra lightweight hand spindle of homegrown Pygora goat fibre. It won the award for Skein - Spindle spun.

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Left - the alpaca-wool blend poncho by Barb Newhouse was lichen dyed. Centre - The Sun and Moon Tunic by Janice Griffiths was woven on a 50 shaft draw loom. Right - Forest Paint Wrap by Heather Kerr combined handspinning, fungus and lichen dyes and weaving.

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This tartan yardage by Terry Mattison won awards for Fabric Woven on 4-shafts and Weaving - Best in Show. It was truly gorgeous.

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I had an entry too! I called this scarf "No Pockets No Problem" as it is a double weave tube with slots allowing parts to be turned inside out. This creates pockets at the ends for your tissue or mad money! It won the award for Weaving - Wearables (Accessory)

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There were also some lovely tapestries by Ila McCallum. The one on the left won the award for Tapestry Weaving.

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This felted structure by Donna Hunter won the award for felting.

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There were several framed wall hangings. The winner was this bird by Linda Peterson.

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The Gorge Handweavers in Oregon formed a study group to contact museums in their area and locate interesting textiles. They then produced this replica coverlet using the design from an old coverlet.

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The ANWG organization started a study group last year to study and commemorate the work of weavers in the ANWG area who have been influential in our weaving lives. Eleven members of the study group brought things they have woven using historical designs. A binder had photos and explanations of what each person had done and about the person who inspired them.

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